Option 3: train

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Marlon takes the train from the city to the little village.

From the windows she can observe the damages of the recent floods.

Farming Methods

Scientists say there's a way to at least decrease the amount of damage natural disasters can do and it all starts in the farm fields.

 

“We have to work with nature, we can't fight it,” Doug Hisken, a Belle Plaine, KS, area farmer said about this year’s overly wet weather leading to flooding problems across much of the state.

From rising prices at the grocery store, extra-long commutes due to road closures to the tax dollars spent repairing those flood damaged roads, this year's wet start has taken a heavy toll on all Kansans.

“Everybody took it on the chin this year,” said Darin Williams, a Waverly area farmer.

But scientists say there's a way to at least decrease the amount of damage natural disasters can do and it all starts in the farm fields.